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All Topics | Topic "Difference Between Diversion And Transimission"
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Author Message
yongxuan gao

Subject: Difference Between Diversion And Transimission   
Posted: 10/29/2007 Viewed: 13628 times
difference between diversion and transimission yongxuan gao xuangao <a href="mailto:xuan.gao@tufts.edu">xuan.gao@tufts.edu</a>Could anyone tell me what the difference between a diverison and a transimission line is? When should I use which?

Thanks.
Jack Sieber

Subject: Re: Difference Between Diversion And Transimission   
Posted: 10/30/2007 Viewed: 13612 times
Re: difference between diversion and transimission Jack Sieber jsieber <a href="mailto:jack.sieber@sei-us.org">jack.sieber@sei-us.org</a>
A transmission link transmits water from a supply source (reservoir, river node, groundwater node or "other supply" node) to a single demand site. A transmission link can have a maximum capacity, either as a percentage of the demand it is supplying (e.g., 50% of demand) or as an absolute flow rate (e.g., 0.5 cubic meters per second).

In contrast, a diversion functions very much like a river--there can be multiple inflows and outflows, reservoirs, groundwater interactions and flow requirements. Typically, a diversion begins by drawing water from a river or another diversion. WEAP will only pull as much water into the diversion as is required by demands or flow requirements on the diversion. A diversion can have a maximum capacity as an absolute flow rate (e.g., 0.5 cubic meters per second). However, a diversion can not transmit water directly to a demand site--you will need a transmission link to move the water from the diversion to a demand site.

Use a transmission link to move water from a supply to one demand. Use a diversion if you want to model a canal or pipeline that supplies more than one demand site, or that has flow requirements or reservoirs to control the flow.

Jack

> Could anyone tell me what the difference between a diverison and a transimission line is? When should I use which?
Bochra Khozam

Subject: Re: Difference Between Diversion And Transimission   
Posted: 10/31/2007 Viewed: 13604 times
Re: difference between diversion and transimission Bochra Khozam bochra <a href="mailto:bochra@mail.sy">bochra@mail.sy</a>Dear Jack

I think we should use the diversion if we want to control the flow from the river into the reservoir, by flow requirements on the diversion, when we want to storage a defined quantity of water in the reservoir .

Because we can't control the flow from the river into the reservoir by transmission link.

Bochra Khozam
Topic "Difference Between Diversion And Transimission"